1. Pierre Cordier

     
  2. Featured Artist:

    caille:

    Stephen DiRado’s photos of Massachusetts mallgoers in the 1980s

    (via photographsonthebrain)

     
  3. Featured Artist: MARIAH ROBERTSON, Lecture: 1030am -12pm Tuesday 10/21 @ the Commons Theatre.

     
  4. Film seniors Elizabeth Williams and Jessica Royce curated a pop up exhibit featuring both Photo students and Film students…checkout the video that Elizabeth made of the exhibit. 

     
     
  5. DON”T FORGET PLEASE>

    OCT @! AT !):#) IN THE COMMONS THEATER>

    YOU”RE GONNA HAVE TO DECODE THE NUMBERS YOURSELF>

     
     
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  7. Make sure you turn on the captions, unless you’re fluent in German. 

     
     

  8. Featured Artist: Bärbel Praun

    anotherplacemag:

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    Since I’ve never lived and worked in one place for more than some months for the last years, I am asking myself questions about home, origin, memories: how does a place/scene come into existence? By loading it…

     

  9. Featured Faculty ::::: Shane Rocheleau

    Please go see all of his series here. Deal? Please?


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    Okay now go see the full works.

     
  10. "What if we could use those peak experiences to make us whole, to render us holy?… and in Houston Smith’s immortal words: ‘Might we begin then to transform our passing illuminations into abiding light?’"
    -Jamie Wheal, FLOW GENOME PROJECT

    Learn more:

    TED talk: From Altered States to Altered Traits
    Jamie Wheal speaks at TEDx Black Rock City. “It’s never been easier to get high, and it’s just as hard as it’s always been to stay that way.”
    http://youtu.be/xYTVfF3yY7s

    (Source: youtube.com, via photographsonthebrain)

     
     
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  12. Featured Undergrad ::::: Carson Parris

    /* There are people touching, and there’s hair, and leaves, and a sense of physical and emotional intimacy accessible to any viewer which is strengthened by the lack of context present in the images. But mostly, it’s about that nice pit below */

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  13. Featured Artist:

    likeafieldmouse:

    Todd Hido

     
  14. likeafieldmouse:

    Why are human faces so unique?


    What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.

    Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.

    In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”

    As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.

    “Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”

    Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique

    (Source: ucresearch)

     
  15. Chemical reactions are those magical moments when the matter that surrounds us suddenly bursts into life. A stunning new video collaboration between scientists and artists now showcases eight different types of these reactions in exquisite detail.

    info here